Changing to Webinar-Style Education: Is it possible?

Changing to Webinar-Style Education: Is it possible?

What do we need to do to really connect to this generation of students? How can we inspire them to accomplish and learn without feeling like we need to do it for them? Can we use the new forum of webinars, workshops, and blog articles with condensed and concise information to hold their attention and get them to do more quality work? Just the other day on an education forum with veteran female Marines, one young woman vented about her fellow college students: “Kids are SLEEPING IN THE FIRST ROW! And when one of my professors calls out a kid by name to answer a question and he gave him this stupid look and didn’t even say a word. SAY SOMETHING! Then we had an essay due last night (an easy essay!) and almost the entire class asked for an extension. Which I get when you really need it! But some of these kids said they just didn’t get around to it in time 🤦🏼‍♀️ Plus 90% of the students I come across have NO respect. Y’all, it’s driving me up a wall. I can’t.” Okay, maybe this is an individual circumstance, or maybe it is a generational issue, or maybe it is because the teacher did not set clear expectations. But maybe, just maybe, we teachers need to admit that the old way of doing things is NOT WORKING!!  Let’s consider that maybe we teachers can use the instant gratification and technological advances of this age to improve our delivery rather than complaining that these students just don’t get it. Because they do.  They do get it.  They...
Thrive Write’s Guide to Writing a Literary Essay…

Thrive Write’s Guide to Writing a Literary Essay…

when you think you can’t.   My skill is teaching people who think they can’t write how to write.  Give me a classroom full of gang members and kids just out of juvenile hall to give me the challenge of getting them to write.  The thing about most English teachers with “regular” kids is that they don’t necessarily need to teach writing the way that I have had to learn to teach writing.  Most English teachers can give a writing topic and the students will at least attempt a response.   They might be having trouble with structure, or grammar or spelling, but they start with something that they can work on.  When I give writing assignments, my students freeze and sometimes attempt to overthrow the school with anarchy.  They have no strategies, no confidence, nothing to help them get going.  Now I’m generalizing the majority of the population; I have had a few poets thrown in there of students who were so-called naturals, but the majority of my students need to learn all the steps that many people take for granted that we think everyone does before, during, and after writing. Who is this for? I have tutored adults of all ages with this program.  This is not strictly for high schoolers. They are strategies that anyone can use for just about any literary writing topic. If any of my students read this, they will simply be reminded of the strategies that use daily.  Most people who are writers, do many of these steps already, so they can be used to learn from scratch or as practice.  My ultimate goal...
Strategies for Classroom Management-For the Most Challenging Classrooms (Part 1)

Strategies for Classroom Management-For the Most Challenging Classrooms (Part 1)

I have worked in alternative high school settings in Southern California for 8 years.  I have seen it all.  I know what works and what does not work.  Control does not work; psychology does.   Part One will discuss What Not To Do and Part Two will discuss What To Do     I was a Teacher’s Assistant in one of the most challenging alternative schools in San Diego County while I was going to college.  During that time, I was able to learn an immense about classroom management as I saw substitute teacher after substitute teacher fall flat on their face, cry, and leave defeated after a classroom of rebellious students, mostly gang members, ate them alive.  I saw the manipulation tactics in full force.  The students switching names, seats, convincing the teacher of made up rules, and overall just taking over the classroom (the kind of classes the Substitute had taught in the inner cities, I’m sure). I have seen students cause teachers to cry and then the students play the victim and blame the sub.  In my experience, I have had a student throw a desk across the room in frustration.  I have kicked students out daily. I have been called every name in the book in front of the whole class and have had a few of them get so close to my face that I could feel their breath.    I have also lost control over my own behaviors that the class was unable to resume. I have tried my hardest to regain some normalcy or control but failed daily.  I have tried everything for...