How to Analyze Expository Texts Through the Rhetorical Appeals

How to Analyze Expository Texts Through the Rhetorical Appeals

Downloadable Worksheet Time— Rhetorical Appeals: for analyzing expository texts!! Who else is excited?!? One thing that I promised you is that I would provide worksheets and activities for you to practice college writing at home at least once a week, so here is the first of many. Description of Rhetorical Appeals Activity: This worksheet is meant to give you a beginners knowledge of how to discuss and identify rhetorical appeals in an expository text.  Expository texts are any text that is non-fiction: newspaper articles, informational journals, blogs, magazine articles are just the beginning. Note: At a later time we can discuss how any types of videos or audio recordings can also be analyzed for rhetoric. Activity: Analyze a newspaper article for rhetoric. Objectives: Students will begin to see that any text can be analyzed for rhetoric. Students will have a beginning knowledge of the meaning of ethos, pathos, and logos. Directions: Print out or find a newspaper article that you are interested in. Use the printable to discuss or write the answers to each question one by one.  Know that each question will have an answer and each answer might be challenging to find.  Look beyond the obvious!! Skip any questions that you are really struggling with and come back to them later. After you have completed as many questions as possible, go back to the ones you skipped. One that you might struggle with is this: What does the author want you to do with the information? Most likely, he/she wants you to change your opinion on a subject, describe. Think about some additional questions about the author:...
What is Rhetoric?

What is Rhetoric?

Everyone uses rhetoric.  Rhetoric is the way that we talk to convince people of what we want them to believe. Rhetoric is not only a formal persuasive speech. Each day we live, every moment we communicate we are attempting to convince others to believe us.  We try to convince them to believe that we are who we think we are by the way we speak, dress, and behave.  If we believe that we are kind people, we will speak kindly to people, we will dress nicely, and treat people with kindness and generosity. We believe something about ourselves and the world and want other people to believe that, too. In this world, we can’t believe that we are kind, say that we are kind, but at the same time treat people badly and convince people that we are kind. We are who we say we are, act like we are, and look like we are through our facial expressions and other nonverbal communication.  If we do not have all three of these aspects to prove what we want people to believe about us then people will be skeptical. This is the Ethos, Pathos, and Logos of Persuasion Ethos is the speaker’s credibility.  If we want to be perceived as a kind person, we must be credible as a kind person.  We must treat people nicely, be generous and patient.  The moment that we don’t do one of these things, our credibility goes down and people begin to question whether we really are who we say we are. Pathos is the emotions that we create in our audience.  In this...
Why Inquiry-Based Lessons?

Why Inquiry-Based Lessons?

You’ll notice quickly that I do not create lessons or activities that do not require some sort of inquiry or critical thinking process.  Throughout my years of teaching students have always said things like, “Ms. Moody, why don’t you just give me the answer?”  It makes me laugh because I realize that no I don’t make it easy by giving them the answer. I don’t mind because I know that the strategies that I teach students will help them in the long run. In this world of instant information, our teaching and learning methods MUST change.  Students, when they want to find out information, can get the knowledge immediately.  The way we gather information has changed so must our teaching methods. 2 Things to Realize about Inquiry-Based Lessons 1.In order for a student to desire knowledge they must first realize that they are lacking something: it could be a skill or a piece of knowledge that is required to complete a task.  When students realize that they NEED information for a task the higher the probability of knowledge retention.  Think: a teenager can memorize every detail of a video game but refuses to memorize science facts for their test.  This student has realized that they must know certain facts in order to complete a task that they are interested in, so they are much more motivated to find and remember the information. Don’t we want students to retain the information that we give them? Don’t we want them to be able to build skills in order for them to survive without us? 2. The second benefit to an inquiry-based lesson...